Gigantic inhuman entities that threaten humanity are something we are all familiar with in the year 2019. Monster Hunter, Attack on Titan, Godzilla – there is something inherently compelling about the tropics, where desperate survivors face incredible chances and incredibly large monsters the end of the world. The story of God Eater 3, like its predecessors, leans heavily on this conceit and tells a pleasant (as light) story as cherry on his crazy action-RPG-cake.

As part of a series traditionally designed for portable PlayStation devices, God Eater 3 is the first entry made with home consoles and PC as primary platforms. Also important is a new developer, Marvelous, a studio that might be well known for its contribution to games with prodigious amounts of swimsuit DLC than the stuff of the monster hunting variety. However, this tonal shift is not as clear as you might think, especially since the series was already full of anime-tropics and aesthetic choices. God Eater 3 does not provide real twists and honestly that is fine. The real friends you make on the road in God Eater games are not the ones with fascinating background stories; they are the ones who help you kill Aragami with the kind of precision that is reserved for surgical procedures.

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Aragami are representative of the evil that threatens the world – they are gigantic predators that devour everything in their wake while the world is drowning under deadly ash storms. A nightmarish fusion of beast and mech, there is something brutal about their designs, which creep into the dividing line between the alien and the biological world that you have to protect. You are the usually silent star in this particular story, doomed to take on the ungrateful job of Aragami extermination for people who have treated you as a replaceable weapon since childhood. There is a predictable sequel of events: you are liberated, you recover from your trauma through the power of friendship, and then you meet a life-changing person who is not quite who she seems to be. There are many similarities between the core story of God Eater 3, the earlier entries in the franchise and which monster-fighting anime is currently trending on Crunchyroll, so while it is a fun story, you temper expectations for crushing moral dilemma & # 39; s.

What is likely to exceed your expectations, whether you are familiar with the specific slaughter mark of God Eater or not, is the fight. Although it's easy to draw parallels with Monster Hunter, God Eater 3 is a bit closer to the acting style of Devil May Cry. It is fast and hectic, relying on linking combinations of high octane and high mobility without getting hit to analyze Aragami efficiently. You have no shortage of exercise options, including a specific Dash skills command, and you can effortlessly switch between melee and ranged fights. The feeling that an Aragami gilded shone with your greatsword in a good fight before you fly away and shoot a shotgun scale straight into the exposed wound, never gets really old.

Another mechanic, now a staple of the God Eater series, is the ability of your weapon to consume the essence of the beasts you kill. If you do this, you can enter the burst mode, allowing you better damage output, more combo moves and a wider range for your base attacks. The effects vary depending on the deployment of your weapon, which offers an interesting level of strategy that you can consider from mission to mission. The toughest bosses in the game have a similar mechanic of their own, where attack patterns can grow a host of other deadly variables, making your defense strategy just as important as your damage output.

Unfortunately, the difficulty curve of the game is rather stagnant until about halfway, when it suddenly rises by raising the number of baddies that you have to bring down at the same time. This may lead to an initial feeling of being underpowered for these exciting distances, where you have to rely on every ounce of your skills not to be nailed to the wall with twice as many deadly laser beams and teleporting dodemachines than what you are used to.

It is not all smooth sailing when it comes to the nuts and bolts of God Eater 3, with some minor annoyances. A particular point of concern here is that the game binds multiple options to the same entrance, and the most frustrating thing is the button to plunder also tied to another action (whether it is a dash or a block, depending on the control scheme) which makes looting difficult. Flashing around the cards as fast as you want is fine and dandy until you want to pick something useful, like making materials; you have a greater chance of coming face to face in a nearby enemy.

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Another problem is the presence of the various adjustment systems that the series has built up over the years. There are crafting systems, skill systems, which looks like over 100 possible skills to use, and upgrades on top of that too. Rummaging with a million and variables to better perform your character is neat at first, but a mastery of those systems is not necessary at all to do well in the game, which means it's easy to ignore them .

The rest of the time spent as a God-eating machine is an affair interrupted by explanatory cutscenes and the management of your various AI companions in the field of war. The AI ​​perform well enough for their respective tasks such as doing damage, chain skills and trying to keep you alive if needed. If you want a bit more of a human feeling about those connections, then there is the possibility to enter the fast and angry Multiplayer Assault Missions, where the driving of Aragami in the ground with partners before the timer runs out is the name of the game. It is a welcome way out of the rut of single player mode and the buffet of relatively mundane missions, so having an option, is a refreshing change of pace for the series.

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God Eater 3 is a solid entrance into the franchise that does not necessarily reinvent itself, but that is not necessary. All the core things that make God Eater so nice, from the lightning fast battle to the anime styles, have been given a new coat of paint and are seductively supported alongside additions such as the well-tuned Assault missions and creative enemies to create a delicious package. Some aspects of the game – such as the level of difficulty and the abundance of superfluous adaptation systems – miss the target, but it is a fun romp with lots of raw fights when you are hungry for an action RPG.