With Pokémon: Let & # 39; s Go, Eevee and Let & # 39; s Go, Pikachu now in the wild, it's time to look forward to what you can expect and – more importantly – what we want from the next real Pokémon game on Switch. Several core functions of Pokémon have been wiped out or adapted for the lighter Let 's Go games. Although the tone fits in those games, for the first attempt of the mainline series on a home console, we would like to see something more essential. This is what we would like to see change for the next eighth generation:

More diversity in wild Pokémon encounters

More diversity in wild Pokémon encounters

Moe: random fights
One of the more radical changes in Let & # 39; s Go was the release of random encounters in favor of physically spawning the monsters on the card. This meant that you could choose to join them or not, so you could finally go through Mt. to come. Moon without swarms by Zubats. Although this is a major change that we believe should be maintained, we would like to branch out that Pokémon and provide a greater variety of ways to start a meeting.

Desired: more creativity
Some of the best examples of this were in Pokémon Diamond and Pearl. Players often had to use every element of the Nintendo DS to find the cute creatures. The series has always used external sources, such as trading, to develop Pokémon, but the four-player generation allowed players to insert older Pokémon games into the DS's Game Boy Advance slot to find the Pokémon meeting percentages specific to those improve games. It was a wild feature that almost completely went unnoticed and Nintendo eventually switched that port in later repetitions of the DS.

We would like to see more adventurous ways to use your Switch. Maybe Game Freak can use the HD Rumble in the Joy-Cons, the touchscreen in handheld mode, or let your Pokémon transfer by storing them in Amiibos. The switch is a versatile machine and we would like Pokémon to let you go to work to catch them all.

Broadened combat skills

Broadened combat skills

Tweak the challenge
Apart from the use of the different physical characteristics of the Switch, we hope that fighting with the more dangerous and mythical monsters will lead to greater premeditation and planning. Stumbling on a legendary Pokémon while exploring a cave is exciting, but those battles often come down to simply a huge stock of Pokéballs.

Let's go hunting
Pokémon can do well to learn from the Monster Hunter series. These fights require a sharp understanding of what you are dealing with and demand that you prepare yourself adequately for a tough encounter. If you encounter a meeting in Monster Hunter without proper equipment or materials, you will experience a clear disadvantage. Although we do not ask Pokémon to adopt the full 3D fight of Monster Hunter, we would like to see some smart and radical changes in existing mechanics. The inclusion of some light combat options outside the fight could go a long way towards expanding the tools available to the player. Using traps on the field or taking advantage of the environment in some way can be an exciting turn. After 20 years of catching Pokémon, the standard routine has become a bit stale.

Let every Pokémon be available

Let every Pokémon be available

Pair Up and Pare Down
Since the beginning of the series, Pokémon games have always been summed up in pairs. This meant that Pokémon Blue players had exclusive access to owners of Scyther and Red, Pinsir, and this stimulated trading between versions. So while we ask that every Pokémon is available in the game, it does not mean that they have to abolish that function. Two versions of the games have always been experienced as exploitative, but it is still a convenient way to promote a community around the games by having players work together to fill their pockets with as many samples as possible. We want to at least find a way to allow us to transfer our Pokémon from previous generations. It does not seem unreasonable to suggest that the Pokémon Bank could extend its functionality to the Switch.

Legendary chores
Instead, we want every Pokémon to be available between the two versions. It's good to make sure you're out of the game to earn your catch, but if you simply add them to your Pokédex with a download code, you'll never get the same itch. Ultra rare Pokémon date from the original Mew game, but considering how often this exercise is done now, we just feel like we're doing errands.

Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire had legendary legends to catch, but they let you solve long riddles and really prove that you understood the game to even find a few. The following Pokémon games are likely to push the total number of Pokémon above 900, and it would certainly be a huge task to put any critter in the game, but it would be nice if they were all available between the two games for trainers who are willing to trace them.

Open it

Open it

A brave new world
Pokémon's second-generation games were important to the franchise because they not only added a whole host of new Pokémon and gyms, but they brought fans two years later and let them explore the entire region from the first generation. This meant that after eight gym pins and the Elite Four players could adopt familiar faces and see what had changed in the intervening years. It has given the world a pleasant continuity on top of its existing, deep source of content.

More choice is a good thing
Although we would like to see the game broke and you can visit all previous locations, we want the game to become more open when we are more practical. A popular fan game based on Pokémon Crystal, called Pokémon Crystal Clear, took the core game and adjusted the layout sufficiently so that you could go to one of the game's cities from the beginning. You were no longer held back by a lack of skills to reach certain areas and could include the 16 gym leaders of the game in any order. To accommodate this, the levels of enemies are scaled to match the number of gym badges you have. So if you've been fighting who is traditionally the last gym leader, their Pokémon are relatively weak, while the "first" gym leader might have a brand new, powerful team if you fought them later.

Change the starters

Change the starters

Meet your new best friend
Another exciting change in Crystal Clear was the ability to choose more than the standard three starting Pokémon. In every game so far, players choose between a Pokémon fire, grass or water. This serves as a simple introduction to Pokémon's rocky, paper combat system in scissors style. Which Pokémon players choose is often an important moment for new players.

Fight against the leader of the gym, Clair, with a non-traditional starter-Pokémon, Tyrogue. Taken from a Pokémon fan game called Pokémon Crystal Clear.

Choose wisely
Crystal Clear gives players access to not only the traditional starters, but also a whole host of other Pokémon that can promote repetition of repetitions. Although this exact idea would be compelling in the Switch version, we would at least like to see them shake things up and vary the types of Pokemon that they choose at the beginning. We have chosen between the same three types in each game if there are other types of types that you could use to show this concept to new players and offer something new to returning players at the same time. For example, we would like to see a series of starting Pokémon of the dark, fighting and paranormal type.

Let the story hear

Let the story hear

Keep it simple
The drama all over the world and the long cutscenes of more recent entries are fine, but this new entry could well be used to focus the story on the personal journey of the central characters instead of the heroic deeds of some maniacal villain. . Maybe you forgive some kind of sneaky plan, but making the problems is equally catastrophic because they only make things unnecessarily complicated.

What is old is new
Part of the story would not only increase the appeal of the core of the game for a younger generation, but would also help bring those of us who have been put off by the Saturday morning cartoon atmosphere & # 39; of games.

Let us take photos

Let us take photos

It has been too long
If Nintendo is not going to make a real sequel to Pokémon Snap, the untracked Pokémon game that enabled players to make the best Pokémon photos, they would have to incorporate their mechanics into the main series. We want this new game to be essentially the successor to Pokémon Snap. Previous games let you take photos at designated spots – sun and moon went as far as judging your photos. But the task of catching Pokémon on film next to Pokéballs would help us revive the revived days of being heavily criticized by the famous photographer, Professor Oak.

Awesome!
What made Pokémon Snap so special when it was released on Nintendo 64 was that it made players feel as if they were discovering these wild creatures themselves. It has given the world of Pokémon a magic that is often drowned out by the enormous amount of creatures that you can find now. By giving players the goal to photograph Pokémon, we can really get to know each of them.

We've offered our suggestions, but there are countless other changes that can help deliver a unique Pokémon experience. Did we miss something? Let us know in the comments what you would like to see when Pokémon hits the Switch, hopefully this year.

While you wait, watch some of your favorite Pokémon look like it in earlier design documents and then you can watch Game Freak's Giga Wrecker Alt, which will be coming to the console sometime in 2019.